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Lead Contents

Temperature Controllers

These Controllers receive sensor signals and control heaters or other devices to maintain a preset temperature. They can also be used for humidity, pressure, and flowrate control. OMRON also provides temperature and humidity sensors.

Overview Features
Principles Classifications
Engineering Data Further Information

Related Contents

Primary Contents

Temperature Controller Glossary

Glossary of Control Terminology

Hysteresis

ON/OFF control action turns the output ON or OFF based on the set point. The output frequently changes according to minute temperature changes as a result, and this shortens the life of the output relay or unfavorably affects some devices connected to the Temperature Controller. To prevent this from happening, a temperature band called hysteresis is created between the ON and OFF operations.

Hysteresis (Reverse Operation)

Hysteresis_Reverse_Operation_graph

Example:

Hysteresis indicates 0.8°C.

Hysteresis (Forward Operation)

Hysteresis_Forward_Operation)_graph

Example:

Hysteresis indicates 0.8°C.

Offset

Proportional control action causes an error in the process value due to the heat capacity of the controlled object and the capacity of the heater. The result is a small discrepancy between the process value and the set point in stable operation. This error is called offset. offset is the difference in temperature between the set point and the actual process temperature. It may exist above or below the set point.

Offset_graph

Hunting and Overshooting

ON/OFF control action often involves the waveform shown in the following diagram. A temperature rise that exceeds the set point after temperature control starts is called overshooting. Temperature oscillation near the set point is called hunting. Improved temperature control is to be expected if the degree of overshooting and hunting are low.

Hunting and Overshooting in ON/OFF Control Action

Hunting_and_Overshooting_in_ON/OFF_Control_Action_graph

Control Cycle and Time-Proportioning Control Action

The control output will be turned ON intermittently according to a preset cycle if P action is used with a relay or SSR. This preset cycle is called the control cycle and this method of control is called timeproportioning control action.

Control_Cycle_and_Time-Proportioning_Control_Action_diagram

Example:

If the control cycle is 10 s with an 80% control output, the ON and OFF periods will be as follows.

Derivative Time

Derivative time is the period required for a ramp-type deviation in derivative control (e.g., the deviation shown in the following graph)that coincides with the control output in proportional control action.The longer the Derivative time is the stronger the derivative control action will be.

PD Action and Derivative Time

PD_Action_and_Derivative_Time_graph

Integral Time

Integral time is the period required for a step-type deviation in integral control (e.g., the deviation shown in the following graph) to coincide with the control output in proportional control action. The shorter the Integral time is the stronger the integral action will be. If the Integral time is too short, however, hunting may result.

PI Action and Integral Time

PI_Action_and_Integral_Time_graph

Constant Value Control

For constant value control, control is preformed at specific temperatures.

Program Control

Program control is used to control temperature for a target value that changes at predetermined time intervals.

Auto-tuning

The PID constant values and combinations that are used for temperature control depend on the characteristics of the controlled object. A variety of conventional methods that are used to obtain these PID constants have been suggested and implemented based on actual control temperature waveforms. Auto-tuning methods make it possible to obtain PID constants suitable to a variety of controlling objects. The most common types of Auto-tuning are the step response, marginal sensitivity, and limit cycle methods.

Step Response Method

The value most frequently used must be the set point in this method.Calculate the maximum temperature ramp R and the dead time L from a 100% step-type control output. Then obtain the PID constants from R and L.

Step_Response_Method_graph

Marginal Sensitivity Method

Proportional control action begins from start point A in this method.Narrow the width of the proportional band until the temperature starts to oscillate. Then obtain the PID constants from the value of the proportional band and the oscillation cycle time T at that time.

Marginal_Sensitivity_Method_graph

Limit Cycle Method

ON/OFF control begins from start point A in this method. Then obtain the PID constants from the hunting cycle T and oscillation D.

Limit_Cycle_Method_graph

Readjusting PID Constants

PID constants calculated in auto-tuning operation normally do not cause problems except for some particular applications. In those cases, refer to the following diagrams to readjust the constants.

Response to Change in the Proportional Band

Wider

Response_to_Change_in_the_Proportional_Band_Wider_graph

It is possible to suppress overshooting although a comparatively long startup time and set time will be required.

Narrower

Response_to_Change_in_the_Proportional_Band_Narrower_graph

The process value reaches the set point within a comparatively short time and keeps the temperature stable although overshooting and hunting will result until the temperature becomes stable.

Response to Change in Integral Time

Wider

Response_to_Change_in_Integral_Time_Wider_graph

The set point takes longer to reach. It is possible to reduce hunting, overshooting,and undershooting although a comparatively long startup time and set time will be required.

Narrower

Response_to_Change_in_Integral_Time_Narrower_graph

The process temperature reaches the set point within a comparatively short time although overshooting,undershooting, and hunting will result.

Response to Change in Derivative Time

Wider

Response_to_Change_in_Derivative_Time_Wider_graph

The process value reaches the set point within a comparatively short time with comparatively small amounts of overshooting and undershooting. Fine-cycle hunting will result due to the change in process value.

Narrower

Response_to_Change_in_Derivative_Time_Narrower_graph

The process value will take a relatively long time to reach the set point with heavy overshooting and undershooting.

Fuzzy Self-tuning

PID constants must be determined according to the characteristics of the controlled object for proper temperature control. The conventional Temperature Controller incorporates an auto-tuning function to calculate PID constants. In that case, it is necessary to give instructions to the Temperature Controller to trigger the autotuning function. Furthermore, temperature disturbances may result if the limit cycle is adopted. The Temperature Controller in fuzzy selftuning operation determines the start of tuning and ensures smooth tuning without disturbing temperature control. In other words, the fuzzy self-tuning function makes it possible to adjust PID constants according to the characteristics of the controlled object.

Fuzzy Self-tuning in 3 Modes

PID constants are calculated by tuning when the set point changes.

When an external disturbance affects the process value, the PID constants will be adjusted and kept in a specified range.

If hunting results, the PID constants will be adjusted to suppress hunting.

Auto-tuning with a Conventional Temperature Controller

Auto-tuning (AT) Function:
A function that automatically calculates
optimum PID constants for controlled objects.

Features:
(1) Tuning will be performed when the AT instruction is given.
(2) The limit cycle signal is generated to oscillate the temperature before tuning.

Auto-tuning_with_a_Conventional_Temperature_Controller_graph

Self-tuning

Self-tuning (ST) Function:
A function that automatically calculates optimum PID constants for controlled objects.

Features:
(1) Whether to perform tuning or not is determined by the Temperature Controller.
(2) No signal that disturbs the process value is generated.

Self-tuning_graph1

Self-tuning

Self-tuning is supported by the E[]S. Trends in temperature changes are used to automatically calculate and set a suitable proportional band.

Self-tuning_graph2

PID Control and Tuning Methods for Temperature Controllers

ModelPIDTwo PIDTwo PID + Fuzzy
Type of PID
E5[]N (See note.)AT, ST**
E5[]SST*
E5ZNAT
E5ZDATAT
C200H-TCAT
C200H-TVAT
C200H-PIDAT
CQM1-TCAT

ST: Fuzzy self-tuning, ST*: Self-tuning, ST**: Executed only for SP changes,AT: Autotuning

Note:Not including the E5ZN

Control Outputs

Control_Outputs_diagram

Relay output:
Contact relay output used for control methods with comparatively low switching frequencies.

SSR output:
Non-contact solid-state relay output for switching 1 A maximum.

Voltage output (ON/OFF output):
ON/OFF pulse output at 5, 12, or 24 VDC externally connected to a high-capacity SSR. ON/OFF action is ideal for high switching frequency and PID action is ideal for time-proportioning control action.

Current output:
Continuous 4- to 20-mA or 0- to 20-mA DC output used for driving power controllers and electromagnetic valves. Ideal for high-precision control. A preset linear output is produced if the load resistance falls below allowable levels.

Voltage output (Linear output):
Continuous 0 to 5 or 0 to 10 VDC output used for driving pressure controllers.Ideal for high-precision control.

Glossary of Alarm Terminology

Alarm Operation

The Temperature Controller compares the process value and the preset alarm value, turns the alarm signal ON, and displays the type of alarm in the preset operation mode.

Deviation Alarm

The deviation alarm turns ON according to the deviation from the set point in the Temperature Controller.

Setting Example

Alarm temperature is set to 110 °.

The alarm set point is set to 10 °C.

Deviation_Alarm_diagram

Absolute-value Alarm

The absolute-value alarm turns ON according to the alarm temperature regardless of the set point in the Temperature Controller.

Setting Example

Alarm temperature is set to 110 °C.

The alarm set point is set to 110 °C.

Absolute-value_Alarm_diagram

Standby Sequence Alarm

It may be difficult to keep the process value outside the specified alarm range in some cases (e.g., when starting up the Temperature Controller), and the alarm turns ON abruptly as a result. This can be prevented with the standby sequential function of the Temperature Controller. This function makes it possible to ignore the process value right after the Temperature Controller is turned ON or right after the Temperature Controller starts temperature control. In this case, the alarm will turn ON if the process value enters the alarm range after the process value has been once stabilized.

Example of Alarm Output with Standby Sequence Set

Temperature rise

Temperature_rise_graph

Temperature Drop

Temperature_Drop_graph

SSR Failure Alarm

(Applicable models: E5CN)

The SSR Failure Alarm is output when an SSR short-circuit failure is detected. A ct (Current Transformer) is used by the Temperature Controller to detect heater current and it outputs an alarm when a short circuit occurs.

Heater Burnout Alarm

(Three phase (E5CN, E5AN, and E5EN only) and single phase)

Many types of heaters are used to raise the temperature of the controlled object. The ct (Current Transformer) is used by the Temperature Controller to detect the heater current. If the heater's power consumption drops, the Temperature Controller will detect heater burnout from the ct and will output the heater burnout alarm.

Heater_Burnout_Alarm_diagram

Alarm Latch

The alarm will turn OFF if the process value falls outside alarm operation range. This can be prevented if the process value enters the alarm range and an alarm is output by holding the alarm output until the power supply turns OFF.

Alarm_Latch_graph

LBA

(Applicable models: E5CN, E5AN, and E5EN)

The LBA (loop break alarm) is a function that turns the alarm signal ON by assuming the occurrence of control loop failure if there is no input change with the deviation above a certain level. Therefore, this function can be used to detect control loop errors.

Configurable Upper and Lower Limit Alarm Settings

(Applicable models: E5[]N and E5[]R)

Configurable_Upper_and_Lower_Limit_Alarm_Settings_diagram

Glossary of Temperature Sensor Terminology

Cold Junction Compensation

The thermo-electromotive force of the thermocouple is generated due to the temperature difference between the hot and cold junctions.
Therefore, if the cold junction temperature fluctuates, the thermo-electromotive force will change even if the hot junction temperature remains stable.
To negate this effect, a separate sensor is built into the Temperature Controller at a location with essentially the same temperature as the cold junction to monitor any changes in the temperature. A voltage that is equivalent to the resulting thermo-electromotive force is added to compensate for (i.e., cancel) changes that occur in the thermo-electromotive force.
Compensation for fluctuations by adding a voltage is called cold junction compensation.

Cold_Junction_Compensating_Circuit_diagram

In the above diagram, the thermo-electromotive force (1) VT that is measured at the input terminal of the Temperature Controller is equal to V (350, 20).
Here, V (A, B) gives the thermo-electromotive force when the cold junction is A °C and the cold junction is B °C.
Based on the law of intermediate temperatures, a basic behavior of thermocouples, (2) V (A, B) = V (A, C) - V (B, C).

Compensating conductor

An actual application may have a sensing point that is located far away from the Temperature Controller.
If normal copper wires are used because the wiring length is limited for a sensor that uses thermocouple wires or because conductors are too expensive, a large error will occur in the temperature.
Compensating conductors are used instead of plain wires to extend the thermocouple wires.
If compensating conductors are used within a limit temperature range (often near room temperature), a thermo-electromotive force that is essentially the same as the original thermocouple is generated, so they are used to extend the thermocouple wires.
However, if compensating conductors that are suitable for the type of thermocouple are not used, the measured temperature will not be correct.

Example of Compensating Conductor Use

Input Shift

A preset point is added to or subtracted from the temperature detected by the Temperature Sensor of the Temperature Controller to display the process value. The difference between the detected temperature and the displayed temperature is set as an input compensation value.

Input_Shift_fig

Glossary of Output Terminology

Reverse Operation (Heating)

The Temperature Controller in reverse operation will increase control output if the process value is lower than the set point (i.e., if the Temperature Controller has a negative deviation).

Reverse_Operation_(Heating)_graph

Direct Operation (Cooling)

Direct_Operation_(Cooling)_graph

Heating and Cooling Control

Temperature control over a controlled object would be difficult if heating was the only type of control available, so cooling control was also added. Two control outputs (one for heating and one for cooling)can be provided by one Temperature Controller.

Heating_and_Cooling_Control_diagram

MV (Manipulated Variable) Limiter

The upper and lower limits for the MV limiter are set by the upper MV and lower MV settings. When the MV calculated by the Temperature Controller falls outside the MV limiter range, the actual output will be either the upper or lower MV limit.

Manipulated_Variable_Limiter_graph1

With heating and cooling control, the cooling MV is treated as a negative value. Generally speaking then, the upper limit (positive value) is set to the heating output and the lower limit (negative value)is set to the cooling output as shown in the following diagram.

Manipulated_Variable_Limiter_graph2

Rate of Change Limit

The rate of change limit for the MV sets the amount of change that occurs per second in the MV. If the MV calculated by the Temperature Controller changes significantly, the actual output follows the rate of change limiter setting for MV until it approaches the calculated value.

Rate_of_Change_Limit_graph

Dead Band

The overlap band and dead band are set for the cooling output. A negative value here produces an overlap band and a positive value produces a dead band.

Dead_Band_graphs

Cooling Coefficient

When adequate control characteristics cannot be obtained using the same PID constants, such as when the heating and cooling characteristics of the controlled object vary significantly, adjust the proportional band on the cooling side (cooling side P) using the cooling coefficient until heating and cooling side control are balanced. P on the heating and cooling control sides is calculated from the following formula.

Heating side P = P

Cooling side P = Heating side P x cooling coefficient

For cooling side P control when heating side characteristics are different, multiply the heating side P by the cooling coefficient.

Heating Side P × 0.8

Heating_Side_P_×_0.8_graph

Heating Side P × 1.5

Heating_Side_P_×_1.5_graph

Positioning-Proportioning Control

Modutrol Motor with a valve is used in this control system, a potentiometer for open/close control reads the degree of opening (position) of the control valve, outputs an open and close signal, and transmits the control output to Temperature Controller. The Temperature Controller outputs two signals: an open and close signal. OMRON uses floating control. This means that the potentiometer does not feed back the control valve position and temperature can be controlled with or without a potentiometer.

Positioning-Proportioning_Control_diagram

Transfer Output

A Temperature Controller with current output independent from control output is available. The process value or set point within the available temperature range of the Temperature Controller is converted into 4- to 20-mA linear output that can be input into recorders to keep the results of temperature control on record.

Transfer_Output_diagram

Glossary of Setting Terminology

Set Limit

The set point range depends on the Temperature Sensor and the set limit is used to restrict the set point range. This restriction affects the transfer output of the Temperature Controller.

Set_Limit_diagram

Multiple Set Points

Two or more set points independent from each other can be set in the Temperature Controller in control operation.

Setting Memory Banks

The Temperature Controller stores a maximum of eight groups of data (e.g., set value and PID constant data) in built-in memory banks for temperature control. The Temperature Controller selects one of these banks in actual control operation.

Setting_Memory_Banks_diagram

Set Point (SP) Ramp

The SP ramp function controls the target value change rate with the variation factor. Therefore, when the SP ramp function is enabled,some range of the target value will be controlled if the change rate exceeds the variation factor as shown on the right.

Set_Point_Ramp_graph

Remote Set Point (SP) Input

For a remote set point input, the Temperature Controller uses an external input ranging from 4- to 20-mA for the target temperature.When the remote SP function is enabled, the 4- to 20-mA input becomes the remote set point.

Event Input

An event input is an external signal that can be used to control various actions, such as target value switching, equipment or process RUN/STOP, and pattern selection.

Input Digital Filter

The input digital filter parameter is used to set the time constant of the digital filter. Data that has passed through the digital filter appears as shown in the following diagram.

Input_Digital_Filter_graph

Temperature Sensor Glossary

Temperature Sensor Types and Features

Pt100 and JPt100

In January 1, 1989, the JIS standard for platinum resistance thermometers (Pt100) was revised to incorporate the IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission)standard. The new JIS standard was established on April 1, 1989. Platinum resistance thermometers prior to the JIS standard revision are distinguished as JPt100.Therefore, make sure that the correct resistance thermometer - Glossary of Industrial Automation">platinum resistance thermometer is being used.

The following table shows the differences in appearance of the Pt100 and JPt100.

Classification by model
Pt100
(New JIS standard)
E52-P15AY
Pt100 is indicated as P.
JPt100
(Previous JIS standard)
E52-PT15A
JPt100 is indicated as PT.

Note:OMRON discontinued production of JPt100 Sensors in March of 2003.

Indicated Temperature when Connecting Pt100 Sensor to JPt100 Input

Indicated_Temperature_when_Connecting_Pt100_Sensor_to_JPt101_Input_graph

Indicated Temperature when Connecting JPt100 Sensor to Pt100 Input

Indicated_Temperature_when_Connecting_JPt100_Sensor_to_Pt101_Input_graph

Temperature Sensor Construction

SheathedStandard
FeaturesCompared with standard models, these sensors have high
resistance to vibration and shock.
The finished outer diameter is extremely slim enabling easy
insertion in small sensing objects, and low heat capacity
enables fast response to changes in temperature.
The sheathed tubing is flexible, enabling insertion and
measurement within complex machinery.
The airtight construction provides high sensitivity and
prevents oxidation, for superior heat resistance and durability.
Compared with the sheathed models, the thick tubing
diameter provides strength and durability.
Slow response speed.
Internal
structure

Thermocouple Measuring Junction Construction

Non-grounded modelsGrounded models
FeaturesFully isolated measuring junction and protective
tubing
Response is inferior to grounded models, but noise
resistance is high.
Widely used for general-purpose applications.
Soldered ends of measuring junction protective
tubing.
Fast response but noise resistance is low.
High productivity at a low cost.
Internal
construction
The protective tubing and thermocouple are
insulated.
There is no insulation between the protective
tubing and thermocouple.

Terminal Block Appearance

Exposed lead wiresExposed terminalsEnclosed terminals
FeaturesLead wires directly extend from
protective tubing, enabling low-
cost manufacturing without
requiring more space.
→ For building into machines
Construction uses exposed
terminal screws for easy
maintenance.
→ For general-purpose indoor use
Construction with enclosed
terminal screws enables broad
range of applications.
→ For indoor industrial equipment
Appearance
Permissible
temperature
in
dry air
Sleeve Standard: 0 to +70°C
Heat Resistive: 0 to +100°C
Lead wire (platinum resistance
thermometer)
Standard (vinyl-covered): -20 to
+70°C
Heat resistive (glass-wool-
covered with stainless-steel
external shield): 0 to 180°C
Lead wire (compensating
conductor)
Standard (vinyl-covered): -20 to
+70°C
Heat resistive (glass-wool-
covered with stainless-steel
external shield): 0 to 150°C
Permissible temperature in dry air
for terminal box: 0 to +100°C
Permissible temperature in dry air
for terminal box: 0 to +90°C

Temperature Sensor Thermal Response

A temperature sensor has a thermal capacity. That means that time is required from when the temperature sensor touches the sensing object until the temperature sensor and sensing object reach the same temperature.
For a thermocouple, the response time is the time required for the temperature sensor to reach 63.2% of temperature of the sensing object. For a resistance thermometer, the response time is the time to reach 50% of temperature of the sensing object.

Thermal Response of Sheathed Temperature Sensors (Reference Value)

Protective tubing: ASTM316L

Test conditionsStatic water, room temperature to 100 °C
Protective
tubing dia. (mm)
1.0 dia.1.6 dia.3.2 dia.4.8 dia.6.4 dia.8 dia.
Indicated valueThermo-
couple
Thermo-
couple
Thermo-
couple
Platinum
resist-
ance
ther-
mometer
Thermo-
couple
Platinum
resist-
ance
ther-
mometer
Thermo-
couple
Platinum
resist-
ance
ther-
mometer
Platinum
resist-
ance
ther-
mometer
Response time1 s max.1 s max.1 s2.5 s1.8 s4.2 s4 s9.9 s12.9 s

Standard Temperature Sensors

Thermal Response of Standard Thermocouple (Reference Value)

Protective tubing: SUS316

Test conditionsStatic waterDry air, room temperature to 100°C
Protective tubing dia. (mm)12 dia. (thermocouple element dia: 1.6 mm)
Indicated valueRoom temperature
to 100°C
100°C to room
temperature
Static airFed air:
1.5 m/s
Fed air:
3 m/s
Response time55 s56 s6 min. 50 s2 min. 2 s1 min. 43 s

Thermal Response of Platinum Resistance Thermometer (Reference Value)

Protective tubing: SUS316

Test conditionsStatic water, room temperature to 100°C
Protective tubing dia. (mm)10 dia.
Indicated value
Response time23.6 s

Vibration and Shock Resistance

The testing standards for temperature sensors specified by JIS are provided in the tables on the right. Refer to these standards and provide sufficient margins for the application conditions.

Vibration Resistance

Thermocouple

(Conforms to JIS C1602-1995)

Test itemFrequency
(Hz)
Double amplitude
(mm)
Testing tim (min)Vibration direction
SweepsDestruction
Resonance test30 to 1000.052---Two axis directions including
length direction
Fixed frequency durability test1000.02---60

Note:This test is not performed for Sensors with non-metal protective tubing.Fixed frequency durability tests are conducted at 70 Hz when the resonance point is 100 Hz.

Platinum Resistance Thermometer

(Conforms to JIS C1604-1997)

Frequency (Hz)Acceleration (m/s2)Sweeps per minuteNo. of sweeps
10 to 15010 to 20210

Shock Resistance

Holding the test product on its side, the product is then dropped from a height of 250 mm onto a steel plate 6 mm thick placed on a hard floor. This process is repeated 10 times, after which the product is checked for electrical faults in the measuring junctions and terminal contacts. This test is not performed, however, on products with non-metal protective tubing (conforms to JIS C1602-1995 and JIS C1604-1997).

Permissible Temperature in Dry Air

The permissible temperature is the temperature limit for continuous usage in air.
For thermocouples with protective tubes, the permissible temperature is determined collectively by the type of thermocouple, the element diameters, the insulating tube material, protective tube materials, heat resistance, and other factors. The permissible temperature is also called the usage limit.
Generally speaking, lowering the usage temperature will increase the life of a thermocouple. Allow sufficient leeway in the permissible temperature.

Sheathed

Thermocouple Permissible Temperature in Dry Air

M: Protective tubing material
D: Protective tubing diameter (mm)

Element MK (CA)
ASTM316L
J (IC)
ASTM316L
D
1 dia.650°C450°C
1.6 dia.650°C450°C
3.2 dia.750°C650°C
4.8 dia.800°C750°C
6.4 dia.800°C750°C
8.0 dia.900°C750°C

Standard

Thermocouple Permissible Temperature in Dry Air

M: Protective tubing material
D: Protective tubing diameter (mm)

Element MK (CA)
SUS310S
K (CA)
SUS316
J (IC)
SUS316
D
10 dia.750°C750°C450°C
12 dia.850°C850°C500°C
15 dia.900°C850°C550°C
22 dia.1,000°C900°C600°C

Permissible Temperature in Dry Air

Element MR
PT0
R
PT1
D
15 dia.1,400°C
JIS symbolType
PT0Protective tubing: Special ceramic
PT1Protective tubing: Ceramic Cat. 1

Reference Material for Temperature Sensors

Thermocouple Standard Potential Difference

Thermocouples generate voltage according to the temperature difference. The potential difference is prescribed by Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS).
The following chart gives the potential difference for R, S, K, and J thermocouples when the temperature of the reference junction is 0°C.

(Standards Published in 1995)

JIS C 1602-1995 (Unit: μV)

CategoryTemperature (°C)0102030405060708090
R standard
potential
difference
0054111171232296363431501573
1006477238008799591,0411,1241,2081,2941,381
2001,4691,5581,6481,7391,8311,9232,0172,1122,2072,304
3002,4012,4982,5972,6962,7962,8962,9973,0993,2013,304
4003,4083,5123,6163,7213,8273,9334,0404,1474,2554,363
5004,4714,5804,6904,8004,9105,0215,1335,2455,3575,470
6005,5835,6975,8125,9266,0416,1576,2736,3906,5076,625
7006,7436,8616,9807,1007,2207,3407,4617,5837,7057,827
8007,9508,0738,1978,3218,4468,5718,6978,8238,9509,077
9009,2059,3339,4619,5909,7209,8509,98010,11110,24210,374
1,00010,50610,63810,77110,90511,03911,17311,30711,44211,57811,714
1,10011,85011,98612,12312,26012,39712,53512,67312,81212,95013,089
1,20013,22813,36713,50713,64613,78613,92614,06614,20714,34714,488
1,30014,62914,77014,91115,05215,19315,33415,47515,61615,75815,899
1,40016,04016,18116,32316,46416,60516,74616,88717,02817,16917,310
1,50017,45117,59117,73217,87218,01218,15218,29218,43118,57118,710
1,60018,84918,98819,12619,26419,40219,54019,67719,81419,95120,087
1,70020,22220,35620,48820,62020,74920,87721,003---------
S standard
potential
difference
0055113173235299365433502573
1006467207958729501,0291,1101,1911,2731,357
2001,4411,5261,6121,6981,7861,8741,9622,0522,1412,232
3002,3232,4152,5072,5992,6922,7862,8802,9743,0693,164
4003,2593,3553,4513,5483,6453,7423,8403,9384,0364,134
5004,2334,3324,4324,5324,6324,7324,8334,9345,0355,137
6005,2395,3415,4435,5465,6495,7535,8575,9616,0656,170
7006,2756,3816,4866,5936,6996,8066,9137,0207,1287,236
8007,3457,4547,5637,6737,7837,8938,0038,1148,2268,337
9008,4498,5628,6748,7878,9009,0149,1289,2429,3579,472
1,0009,5879,7039,8199,93510,05110,16810,28510,40310,52010,638
1,10010,75710,87510,99411,11311,23211,35111,47111,59011,71011,830
1,20011,95112,07112,19112,31212,43312,55412,67512,79612,91713,038
1,30013,15913,28013,40213,52313,64413,76613,88714,00914,13014,251
1,40014,37314,49414,61514,73614,85714,97815,09915,22015,34115,461
1,50015,58215,70215,82215,94216,06216,18216,30116,42016,53916,658
1,60016,77716,89517,01317,13117,24917,36617,48317,60017,71717,832
1,70017,94718,06118,17418,28518,39518,50318,609---------
K standard
potential
difference
003977981,2031,6122,0232,4362,8513,2673,682
1004,0964,5094,9205,3285,7356,1386,5406,9417,3407,739
2008,1388,5398,9409,3439,74710,15310,56110,97111,38211,795
30012,20912,62413,04013,45713,87414,29314,71315,13315,55415,975
40016,39716,82017,24317,66718,09118,51618,94119,36619,79220,218
50020,64421,07121,49721,92422,35022,77623,20323,62924,05524,480
60024,90525,33025,75526,17926,60227,02527,44727,86928,28928,710
70029,12929,54829,96530,38230,79831,21331,62832,04132,45332,865
80033,27533,68534,09334,50134,90835,31335,71836,12136,52436,925
90037,32637,72538,12438,52238,91839,31439,70840,10140,49440,885
1,00041,27641,66542,05342,44042,82643,21143,59543,97844,35944,740
1,10045,11945,49745,87346,24946,62346,99547,36747,73748,10548,473
1,20048,83849,20249,56549,92650,28650,64451,00051,35551,70852,060
1,30052,41052,75953,10653,45153,79554,13854,47954,819------
J standard
potential
difference
005071,0191,5372,0592,5853,1163,6504,1874,726
1005,2695,8146,3606,9097,4598,0108,5629,1159,66910,224
20010,77911,33411,88912,44513,00013,55514,11014,66515,21915,773
30016,32716,88117,43417,98618,53819,09019,64220,19420,74521,297
40021,84822,40022,95223,50424,05724,61025,16425,72026,27626,834
50027,39327,95328,51629,08029,64730,21630,78831,36231,93932,519
60033,10233,68934,27934,87335,47036,07136,67537,28437,89638,512
70039,13239,75540,38241,01241,64542,28142,91943,55944,20344,848
80045,49446,14146,78647,43148,07448,71549,35349,98950,62251,251
90051,87752,50053,11953,73554,34754,95655,56156,16456,76357,360
1,00057,95358,54559,13459,72160,30760,89061,47362,05462,63463,214
1,10063,79264,37064,94865,52566,10266,67967,25567,83168,40668,980
1,20069,553---------------------------

Reference Temperature Characteristics for Platinum Resistance Thermometers (Ω)

Pt100

JIS C 1604-1997

Temperature
(°C)
-100-0Temperature
(°C)
0100200300400500600700800
060.26100.000100.00138.51175.86212.05247.09280.98313.71345.28375.70
-1056.1996.0910103.90142.29179.53215.61250.53284.30316.92348.38378.68
-2052.1192.1620107.79146.07183.19219.15253.96287.62320.12351.46381.65
-3048.0088.2230111.67149.83186.84222.68257.38290.92323.30354.53384.60
-4043.8884.2740115.54153.58190.47226.21260.78294.21326.48357.59387.55
-5039.7280.3150119.40157.33194.10229.72264.18297.49329.64360.64390.48
-6035.5476.3360123.24161.05197.71233.21267.56300.75332.79363.67---
-7031.3472.3370127.08164.77201.31236.70270.93304.01335.93366.70---
-8027.1068.3380130.90168.48204.90240.18274.29307.25339.06369.71---
-9022.8364.3090134.71172.17208.48243.64277.64310.49342.18372.71---
-10018.5260.26100138.51175.86212.05247.09280.98313.71345.28375.70---

JPt100

JIS C 1604-1997

Temperature (°C)-100-0Temperature (°C)0100200300400500
059.57100.000100.00139.16177.13213.93249.56284.02
-1055.4496.0210103.97143.01180.86217.54253.06---
-2051.2992.0220107.93146.85184.58221.15256.55---
-3047.1188.0130111.88150.67188.29224.74260.02---
-4042.9183.9940115.81154.49191.99228.32263.49---
-5038.6879.9650119.73158.29195.67231.89266.94---
-6034.4275.9160123.64162.08199.35235.45270.38---
-7030.1271.8570127.54165.86203.01238.99273.80---
-8025.8067.7780131.42169.63206.66242.53277.22---
-9021.4663.6890135.30173.38210.30246.05280.63---
-10017.1459.57100139.16177.13213.93249.56284.02---

Standard Temperature Characteristics for Element-interchangeable Thermistors

The following chart gives the temperature characteristics for low-cost thermistors used in the E5C2, E5L, and E5CS.

JIS C 1611-1975

Note:Amount of change in resistance per degree C in the resistance deviation and specified temperature.